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  • Realtà virtuale (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)
  • Al Cibart di Carrara (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)
  • Macchine virtuose (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)
  • Marmo Rosso Verona per la Maternità (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)
Realtà virtuale (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Realtà virtuale (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Al Cibart di Carrara (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Al Cibart di Carrara (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Macchine virtuose  (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Macchine virtuose (dal n. 667 L'Informatore del Marmista)

Marmo Rosso Verona per la Maternità  (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del  Marmista)

Marmo Rosso Verona per la Maternità (dal n. 669 L'Informatore del Marmista)



CONTENTS
EVENTS  Carraramarmotec and Carrara Marble Weeks | Design in Milan ...also in stone  DESIGN  marble applications in the fashion MATERIALS The white marbles of Versilia RESTORATION  Restoration, decoration and theology of stone EDUCATION Dry walls building technique  COLUMNS Cultural events | Meetings |Book review | Exhibitions | Classified advertisements | Company news| Notes

 

 Article of the month

Marble applications in the fashion di Elisabetta Benelli

Marble applications in the fashion “…I, from Carrara, which lies below, had a cave among the white marble as a home” (Dante Alighieri, Divine Comedy, Inferno XX). Given my Apuan origins, I enthusiastically accepted the challenge to talk about marble and its possible applications (so far rather sporadic) in the fashion and accessories sector, a field where I work as a lecturer for the degree course in Fashion Culture and Design at the University of Florence. I immediately realised the complexity of the topic since marble, although widely used in artistic, architectural and even furnishing contexts, has not yet managed to express its potential in this sphere. While “marble-design” immediately suggests the lamps by the Castiglioni brothers for Flos or Angelo Mangiarotti’s “inter-linking” tables, or even the vibrating walls presented more recently by Patricia Urquiola - that sinuously outline space by filtering the light - “marble-fashion” (apart from a few recent, transgressive applications of marble effects such as Adidas by Jeremy Scott or Viviene Westwood’s plateau for Melissa) does not bring to mind any particular details accessories where marble plays the leading role. So it seemed to me all the more stimulating to research how marble, and especially Carrara white marble, has been used in various ways outside traditional spheres: I recall, for example, that in ancient Egypt materials such as marble, together with stones such as green malachite and later also black galena, were placed on the eyelids of men, women and even children as a cure for certain eyesight pathologies or even merely to ensure a more intense gaze; the very finely ground powders of these substances were mixed with animal fats, beeswax or resins to modify consistency so that it could be smeared, as well as to enhance therapeutic effects. In the Romantic period, alabaster and marble powder were used in similar ways by women to create a diaphanous complexion, since pallor was associated with suffering and intense feelings. Baudelaire wrote that “women in one way or another undertake a kind of duty, busying themselves to achieve a magical and super-natural appearance; they have to astonish and be fascinating; idol, they have to use make-up to be adored”. Returning to applications of marble in fashion, without doubt the conceptual jewellery of Dutch artist Ted Noten is very interesting - fragments of white marble are set in resin but, in this context, I would like especially to mention approaches (certainly less frequent) seeking to identify new expressive possibilities for this material. To this end, I was particularly impressed by the collection of designer Paolo Santoni commissioned in 2007 by Elle Marmi (Carrara): the models, named after the most famous quarries in the area, Gioia, Lorano and Canalgrande, were made using python and crocodile skin made even more precious by inserts of Calacata white marble, Red France and Verde Aver. While the marble in this ambitious project, with its natural stripes and intrinsic beauty, is even more impressive than the skin and gives the collection a perceptible sense of luxury, the evening clutch bags designed by Studio Memo in Florence see stone material become the absolute protagonist of the highly sought after collection created in the workshops of Mauro Morelli, in Carrara. After years of research and experimentation, the Apuan company guided by Claudio Morelli managed to use marble as the base material for digital printing: this important application, which makes it possible to eliminate visually any imperfections in the slabs, opens up new and fascinating prospects for the use of this undisputedly fine material ensuring major communicative impact. Lastly, there are some interesting projects developed by students attending the degree course in Fashion Culture and Design that to some extent have “moulded” this material to create articles ideal for the versatile world of fashion by using effective expressive concepts capable of transforming the “rigidity” of marble into a vivid and vibrant material ensuring surprising colour effects: I hope that this may be the start of a rewarding collaboration and a way to involve young people as future designers with materials that, like marble, need to be re-designed and brought out of market logics that are often conceptually obsolete such as the reproduction statuettes of David or other out-dated protagonists all too often “Made in Taiwan”.

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